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20121205
20121213
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to the conversation on the fiscal cliff this morning from the washington journal and a look at how the business is might be affected. of >>> let's begin with what iss bi comeess and how does it t: about?t's >> guest: is an organization with a simple mission. our job is trying to make it ist easier for business leaders inon about country that care about policy issues but don't have a washington office or don't havea town spe to speak out on the issuesak of the public policy. >> host: so, is this a brand-new organization? >> guest: even a route for years three and a half supported by some of the biggest companies in c the world, but o- business leaders are around the country. we go out to small business owners and entrepreneurs and venture capitalists and try to o get them g more involved in the policy-making process. we so what we do isbring administrn officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to do briefings with business leaders. we also bring those business leaders to washington and the president's economic team and tell them how to grow jobs and help the eco
. >> on tomorrow morning's washington gorgeous -- washington journal, we continue a look at the fiscal cliff and what happens if those cuts take place in january. after that, charles clark of the government executive media group, looks at the domestic program cuts. and then more about the issue with is bell sawhill
approach to dealing with the fiscal cliff. now, this morning, mr. president, i listened to speaker boehner where he said the ball is in the president's court. i couldn't disagree more with the speaker of the house. and i think it's important to point out that since we've been working on trying to deal with this deficit issue, we have already agreed to over a trillion dollars of cuts in spending. it's in discretionary domestic spending, some of the most challenging areas that affects our most vulnerable people. we've implemented that. this is since the recommendations of the simpson-bowles commission came out. we took action. we imposed caps on discretionary dome spending. our federal work force has been through years, a couple years of pay freezes. we've seen programs that have been cut back on the support that they give people who need help. so we've already contributed on the spending side. is it enough? no. do we need to do more? absolutely. but we've done that. the next piece that must be done is the revenue piece. you can't have a balanced approach unless you have the revenues. smeen
and social security should be part of negotiations on fiscal cliff. we will talk with john larson on how house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate representative of its country's people. turkish journalism has reported that the new america foundation. two men have returned from the country into the to the west can do more to help the syrian people. [inaudible conve
of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterson. i would like to give you a review of why we are supporting this project today. starting about 30 years ago, after studying the profound demographic trends, on the vast and unfunded promise we have made. i have decided was not unsustainable, but a primary threat to the future. speaking of unsustainable, in the nixon white house in which i served, the chairman of the council, if something is unsustainable, he says it continues to stop. or if you don't like that, if your worst eyes, i suggest that you does not dis
: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, i feel the need to point out something this morning that's perfectly obvious to most americans but which democrats in washington still don't seem to grasp. i'm referring to the fact that any solution to our spending and debt problem has to involve cuts to out-of-control washington spending. i know that might sound obvious to most people but for all the president's talk about the need for a balanced approach, the truth is he and his democratic allies simply refused to be pinned down on any spending cuts. americans overwhelmingly support some level of cuts to government spending as part of a plan to cut the federal deficit. yet, the president will not commit to it. he refuses to lead on the issue. the president seems to think if all he talks about are taxes and that's all reporters write about, somehow the rest of us will magically forget that government spending is completely out of control and that he himself has been insisting on balance. a couple of weeks ago we saw his plan. after four straight trillion-dollar
this morning business time to speak, particularly during this time of tension, we're looking at the fiscal cliff, to really use a few minutes to pay a tribute to two wonderful, outstanding senators who will be leaving us at the end of this term that i have served with. wonderful women named senator olympia snowe of maine and senator kay bailey hutchison of texas. dear friends across the other side of the aisle but though they were on the other side of the aisle there was no great divide between us. we have known each other for many years. a -- a few words i'd like to say about my very dear friend, senator olympia snowe. i served with senator snowe both in the house of representatives and then in the united states senate. wow. what an outstanding senator and congressperson she has been. and i know we will continue to see senator snowe in some type of role in public service, because that's just the kind of person she is. she is deeply in her d.n.a. a public servant. senator snowe has served her state of maine and our nation so well. she's one of our most respected members of congress, known
and academia, and they'll discuss the poll's results, middle class perspectives on the economy and the fiscal cliff. it's expected to get under way shortly, and we're bringing it to you live here on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, all. good morning. i'm john fox sullivan, i'm publisher at large of atlantic media company, we publish the atlantic, national journal, government executive, a new product, quartz, and we want to welcome you to this special event this morning. and i want to welcome our c-span audience which is tuning in. um, this is the 15th allstate/national journal heartland poll that we're going to be discussing this morning. since april of 2009, allstate and national journal and the atlantic have partnered in surveying the public opinion of a little bit oriented towards the mitt middle class -- middle class, but public at large. this was initiated by our friend ed reilly and ron brownstein of national journal and post the economic crisis, we decided to see what the american public pe
of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm very pleased to give you my perspective on where we are. and let me just say, hearing some of the poll video here, the beginning of the question, i will start by something that i often say when i'm giving remarks, that i'm struck with in my district, i hope many of us are, having a swing district in the suburbs of philadelphia, people in the same group, no matter how partisan they are more have nonpartisan the group is, they will say to differ quite a stupid pills and i want you to go to washington and i want you to stand on defenseless but i don't want you to give an inch. values matter, our priorities matter. i want you to go and fight for us. i will. then someone else will get up and say, i want you to compromise, i want you to find a middle ground, i want you to get these done. that's the 10th time this happened to me. i thought that's
moments, a discussion of house spending cuts in the so-called fiscal cliff. in a little less than an hour, more about the fiscal cliff with republican representative tom cole from oklahoma. then the head of fema testifies on capitol hill about the government's response to hurricane sandy. and later, senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10